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The members of SLPS gathered on Saturday, May 5, 2018 to honor the marriage feast of the Lord and Lady. Beltane brings the marriage of the Goddess and God, coming together to form a union. The creation of life, the son of the Goddess happens over the summer, as the Wheel turns and the year moves towards Litha.

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Beltane 2018, Altar, Saturday, May 5, 2018, Salt Lake City, UT

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Beltane 2018, Altar, Saturday, May 5, 2018, Salt Lake City, UT

To all the readers, the time has come to archive the archives… from the front page. SLPS has decided to shelve internally its content. It has retained some of the more important community stories on the rolling blog and archives sidebar, but all other posts have been internally archived on the WordPress server (don’t worry, we wouldn’t delete our digital history!). This was to clean up the blog itself and to allow for easier reading. We look forward now to years of practice, rituals, events, readings, community service, and fun to come. You can still find old posts using the search box, searching subject tags such as “Pride, Moab, rituals, community service, Ostara, Plazafest” and etc. We also have archived our blog over the years in the Wayback Machine on the Internet Archive.

We plan to do an annual archive of stories to keep the new year fresh. All our pictures are still available on our Facebook page. If you are conducting research and history, and can’t find a post, please contact us and we can assist you.

SLPS read for a third year in a row at the 2018 15th Annual SLC International Tattoo Convention Saturday and Sunday March 24-25 at the Salt Palace Convention Center. $10 readings for the tattoo goes and artists. We were placed next to another piercer/reader by the competition area, but all was well, with a total of 30 readings being done.

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15th Annual SLC International Tattoo Convention 2018, booth, Salt Palace Convention Center, Saturday and Sunday March 24-25, 2018, Salt Lake City, UT

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The light has returned, and the members are happy to see the dark times over Sunday, February 4, 2018. Much introspection and meditation. The traditional beginning of Spring, the members honored the goddess Brigid and gave offerings in thanks of her continued support of the society.

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Imbolc 2018, altar, Sunday, February 4, 2018, Salt Lake City, UT

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Imbolc 2018, Brigid, Sunday, February 4, 2018, Salt Lake City, UT

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Imbolc 2018, altar close up, Sunday, February 4, 2018, Salt Lake City, UT

Yule was celebrated Sunday, December 31, 2017. The last day to end the year and welcome 2018. The society met to honor the return of the Oak King and say goodbye to the Holly King till Midsummer.

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Yule 2017, altar with Holly King plaque and Arianrhod, Sunday, December 31, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

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Yule 2017, altar with candles, Sunday, December 31, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

To those trying to purchase Enheduanna vols 1 and 2 from its website, we have worked a temporary solution for our shopping cart issue. You can click on the link for Paypal on the product page in “click here to buy now” which will direct you to Paypal. Sorry an inconvenience, we were just informed of the issue. Alternatively you can also buy your copies off of this site under the Enheduanna tab.

The society gathered to honor the kindred and deities on during the Samhain season Sunday, November 5, 2017. Due to scheduling the ritual was pushed back a few days to allow for accommodations, but the gods and kindred were pleased none the less!

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Samhain 2017, altar with Hekate and Anubis, Sunday, November 5, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

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Samhain 2017, altar side, Sunday, November 5, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

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Samhain 2017, altar with candles, Sunday, November 5, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

The Salt Lake Pagan Society is pleased to announce the publication of vol 2 of its literary journal Enheduanna. Vol. 2 continues with its goal of promoting creative literary and writing spaces in the contemporary Pagan community. This volume has returning and new authors, with over 20 from around the world contributing their works. Featured work is part 2 of “The Sacred Faeires’ Chronicles”: journal entries published for the first time detailing the history of the Sacred Faery group of Pagans in Utah from 1989-1993. Vol. 2 includes essays, poetry, memoir, creative nonfiction, and short fiction.

Languages included in this issue: English and Spanish.

Price is $14.99 and flat rating shipping worldwide. Hardcover book ships from China.

Go to our sister website enheduannajournal.com to get your copy today or click here!

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The Salt Lake Pagan Society is pleased to announce its literary journal, Enhedunna, has been offered to be included in EBSCO products. “EBSCO is one of the primary vendors of databases for libraries and research. EBSCO will index the journal, having a PDF file on their servers. Enheduanna will live on forever, accessible to millions of people and thousands of libraries that subscribe to their products.” said president Muad’Dib who also happens to be a librarian. A substantial feat, only in its second year. SLPS is humbled and gratified that the journal is being so recognized for its literary and scholastic achievement, adding legitimacy to the scholastic study of Paganism.

SLPS enjoyed a pleasant, hot day at Liberty Park at the 16th Annual Salt Lake City Pagan Pride Day on Saturday, August 12, 2017. The day was clear, with a bright shining sun. President Muad’Dib opened the festivities with a morning druid ritual to the Celtic sun god Lugh at 10am. Twenty five people gathered, hands were raised, and the drinking horn passed around in offering to open the wallets of customers, promote inclusivity, and all around good Pagan community.

A steady flow of patrons came through the park. SLPS read tarot and palms. It was very hot at points in the afternoon, and the food vendor failed to show, but frozen ice cones cooled those in the park. About twenty five vendors showed from across Utah and Montana. Raven Digitalis was present signing his newly released booked Esoteric Empathy: A Magickal and Metaphysical Guide to Sensitivity. He led the closing right, an alchemical ceremony to Baphomet at 5pm.

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, open druid ritual to Lugh, Raven Digitalis in brown, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, drinking horn offering, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT (Photo by Pam Hennesey)

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, drinking horn offering with Jennifer Coates, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT (Photo by Pam Hennesey)

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, drinking horn offering with Muad’Dib, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT (Photo by Pam Hennesey)

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, drinking horn offering with Muad’Dib (right), Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT (Photo by Pam Hennesey)

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, vendors looking west, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, vendors, looking southwest, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, SLPS Booth looking south with Woman Between the Wolves, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, vendors looking southeast, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, open ritual area looking southwest, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, Raven Digitalis signing books, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, Raven Digitalis and Muad’Dib, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, people in the SLPS booth, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, closing ritual to Baphomet, Raven Digitalis center brown, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

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Salt Lake City 16th Annual Pagan Pride Day, Raven Digitalis leading closing ritual to Baphomet, Saturday, August 12, 2017, Liberty Park, Salt Lake City, UT

Video of the day early morning

The members enjoyed a lovely Lughnasadh, praising the Celtic sun god Lugh on Saturday, August 5, 2017. The gathering was held at the temple, with dimming light in the west and the altar of life set in the center. A beautiful sunset graced the meditations, and a journey was led to meet the Celitc God, who gave warm, brotherly advice to those present. The feastings included chicken, mashed potatoes, and baked asparagus.

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Lughnasadh 2017, altar with dog Freyja, Saturday, August 5, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

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Lughnasadh 2017, l to r: Shy Fox, Willow and Rachel Figueroa, Spencer Angell, Saturday, August 5, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

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Lughnasadh 2017, L to r: Spencer Angell, Willow Figueroa, Shy Fox, Saturday, August 5, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

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Lughnasadh 2017, feast, Saturday, August 5, 2017, Salt Lake City, UT

We welcome Montana based author Raven Digitalis to the 2017 Festival! (1)

Salt Lake Pagan Society (1)

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SLPS met under cool sky, warm earth, and to the sounds of crickets in the late July evening to celebrate Lughnasadh, the first harvest, and honor the Celtic God Lugh on Saturday, July 30, 2016. The altar was set, adorned with seasonal items, cock candles, corn, nude Lugh painting, and flowers. The fruits of the first harvest, the Society garden, were presented before the Gods. The harvest included: baquieu and romaine lettuce; onions; shallots;  shishito, serrano, and anaheim peppers; okra, yellow squash; parsley, oregano, and dill herbs. Four types of jam from the fruit trees that have produced from the garden: apricot mango, apricot oregon grape, apricot plum, and plum (plums from the red plum trees on the curb). The Society is greatly blessed to have such harvests from the Good Earth Mother, Gaia. All the hard work of the garden has paid off!

Homemade cornmeal buttercream cupcakes were made by member Stesah Bowden. Wyld Extra Pale Ale and Moab Brewery Dead Horse Amber were the drinks of choice for John Barleycorn, who is burned as an offering from the wheat/corn to the gods at this time. Without the god Lugh, Lughnasadh is celebrated at Lammas, as a holiday of thanksgiving surrounding the first of three harvests that happen in August, September, and October.

The members meditated to the song “Lammas” on the album Circle of the Seasons by Lisa Thiel. The members went around afterwards in a circle and offered up thanks for all the things the were grateful for in life, lending that energy to the overall gratitude of the harvests.

The feasts including sauteed yellow squash with bacon, onions, and shallots (a traditional Gullah/Charleston, SC recipe by Muad’Dib who hails from that part of the world), BBQ-ed ribs, and chicken mole enchiladas.

Lughnasadh 2016, altar, Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, harvests of the Society garden l to r- baquieu and romaine lettuce; yellow squash; Anaheim, Serrano, and shishito peppers; okra; shallots; onions; parsley, dill, and oregano herbs. Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, altar with harvests l to r-romaine lettuce, yellow squash, Anaheim, Serrano, and shishito peppers; okra; tomatoes; shallots; onions; parsley. Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, cornmeal and buttercream muffins, Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, fruit jam from fruit tree harvests l to r- apricot mango, apricot Oregon grape, plum, and plum apricot, Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, Woman Between the Wolves lighting south candle, Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, l to r- Shy Fox, Muad’Dib, and Woman Between the Wolves, Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, preparing sauteed squash with bacon, onion and shallot (from garden), Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Lughnasadh 2016, feast: chicken mole enchiladas with guacamole, ribs with mustard bbq sauce, and sauteed squash, Saturday, July 30, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

The Satanic Temple-Utah Chapter has been up and running since February of 2016. Holding regular open meetings at the public library, they have encouraged the community to think rationally and to consider the separation of church and state.

The temple hosted an unbaptism for Salt Lake City on Sunday, July 24, 2016 from 7-10pm at club metro. Cost was $10 at the door. Participants were required  to sign their soul over to Satan, which protected the event from those unworthy of being unbaptized (meaning protesters). About thirty people participated, dipping hands in dry ice, having upside down crosses painted on their forehead in fake blood, or being lit on fire (members of the temple).Those conducting the rites were in ritual regalia (or none), with Baphomet watching in the background. Sketch Cabaret of Salt Lake City helped provide entertainment. The chapter head of Arizona, Stu De Haan, participated in the rite in support of the Utah Chapter.

From TST’s Facebook, they posted about the unbaptism

“Within many theocratic constructs, baptism is both the key to one’s salvation and a claim placed by the church on its members. This claim is purposefully imposed on infants or children too young to understand what is being asked of them, who are expected to forever be subservient to the theocracy of their upbringing. It is a vow to never question or seek out truth, a complete relinquishment of personal power, and a lifetime of servitude to a vengeful dictator. 

But here, now, we stand before you and embrace the name of Satan not as a deity but as a symbol of rebellion against these impositions. A claiming back of our inherent right to personal sovereignty and morality. We are here to shed ourselves of our previous submissions and in doing so, we are reborn into our chosen life led by Satanic ideals of liberty, justice, benevolence, empathy, and common sense.”

The event had been well advertised, with flyers posted around the city from original artwork done by one of the core council member Autumn Rogers and online with digital art done by the art director of the Arizona chapter Morgan Elizabeth. The temple hopes to make it an annual event.

(Photos used by permission of The Satanic Temple-Utah Chapter)

Flyer for The Satanic Temple-Utah Chapter done by Autumn Rogers

Flyer for The Satanic Temple-Utah Chapter Unbaptism event by Morgan Elizabeth of the Arizona Chapter.

The Satanic Temple-Utah, Unbaptism, Sunday, July 24, 2016, Club Metro, Salt Lake City, UT

The Satanic Temple-Utah, l to r back- Chalice Blythe, Nathaniel, Autumn Rogers (mask), Stu De Haan (end), Unbaptism, Sunday, July 24, 2016, Club Metro, Salt Lake City, UT

The Satanic Temple-Utah, Unbaptism, Stu De Haan (left center) and Nathaniel (right center), set on fire, Sunday, July 24, 2016, Club Metro, Salt Lake City, UT

The Satanic Temple-Utah, Unbaptism, Chalice Blythe (center) and Autumn Rogers (mask), Sunday, July 24, 2016, Club Metro, Salt Lake City, UT

The Satanic Temple-Utah, Unbaptism, l to r- Chalice Blythe, participant, Autumn Rogers, Sunday, July 24, 2016, Club Metro, Salt Lake City, UT

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A little summer kitchen magic! Jam Making… that’s what the members of SLPS did for their July full moon, known as the Buck moon when young buck’s antlers grow and come in, on Saturday, July 17, 2016.

The apricots and Oregon grapes used for the jam mix had come from the Society’s own back yard. The apricots and grapes were processed and heated with lemon juice and pectin. Sugar was added and a roiling boil achieved. The jars and lids were heated in a water bath to prevent bursting from the heat differential. The jars were filled and set upside to seal the lids while they cooled. After 5 hours, the society output 23 mason jars of apricot Oregon grape jam! The taste is sweet yet wild. Delicious!

July 2016 Full Buck Moon Ritual, jam making-Stesha Bowden (l) and Shy Fox cutting apricots, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 Full Buk Moon Ritual, jam making-Oregon grapes, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 Full Buck Moon Ritual, jam making-apricots and Oregon grapes processed, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 Full Buck Moon Ritual, jam making-cooking apricot and Oregon grape jam mix and bathing jars, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 Full Buck Moon Ritual, jam making-Muad’Dib stirring jam mix, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 Full Buck Moon Ritual, jam making-set up, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 Full Buck Moon Ritual, jam making-filling jam jar, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 Full Buck Moon Ritual, jam making-jam jars sealing and cooling, Saturday, July 17, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

A new meeting took place Sunday, July 10, 2016 for the druid community. President Cureton formed a Facebook group after noticing there wasn’t a group in Utah for the druids. One of the members took action and planned a simply picnic with ritual. Those who attended had a fabulous time in the early July morning, finding joy in community and meeting other druids. “Druids in Utah tend to be alone in the woods (pun intended). So few meet ups, rituals, or other activities. It all tends to be centered around witches, wiccans, and trad craft. There was a group that folded a few years ago, Nine Silver Hazels, and one or two Celtic reconstruction groups here, but they are secret. In total I only know about 10 druids in the state and about half of them are ADF (Ár nDraíocht Féin: A Druid Fellowship)”, said president Cureton.

SLPS looks forward to the new growth and outreach to come. President Cureton also started a local home circle called Awen, Oak, and Sage (also Facebook) from AODA (Ancient Order of Druids in America) for those interested in revivalist Welsh druidry.

Utah Druid Community meetup l to r- Seth and Kay Mildenhall, Josh Williams, Christina Neville, Sunday, July 10, 2016, Warm Springs Park, Salt Lake City, UT

SLPS has 20 fruit and nuts trees, with lots of variety. Apple, plum, peach, pears, nectarine, apple, almond, and apricot! Blueberry bushes, Oregon grape, and concord grape as well as strawberries abound.  The apricots and Oregon grape came in and have been pick off one tree, ready to be made into homemade jam. SLPS has a long tradition of jamming it’s fruits, but sometimes so many come in that the trees have to be propped for support!

Fruit gathering for homemade jam making, apricot tree supported with boards due to so much fruit, Sunday, July 10, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Fruit gathering for homemade jam making, Muad’Dib getting apricots, Sunday, July 10, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Fruit gathering for homemade jam making, gathering Oregon grapes, Sunday, July 10, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

A planning meeting took place for the SLC Pagan Pride Day committee and board on Friday, July 8, 2016. The organization has decided to growth the festival, which means  creation of news offices such as a PR person, tech, and policy writer, adopting an ethical standard of business practice, and beefing up the digital heritage and infrastructure with a controlled domain. The goal of the new phase of Pagan Pride is to reach out to the state of Utah to provide education, culture, and foster unity in the community while growing the festival, which will be held on Saturday, September 17, 2016 at Liberty Park in Salt Lake City

SLPS met on Saturday, July 2, 2016 at 9pm to honor the goddess of America, Columbia. The altar was decorated with Independence Day decorations (for July 4th). Pomegranate wine and apricots off one of the society trees were offered. Stars and Stripes Forever, one of the most patriotic American marches by John Philip Sousa was played as members danced around the altar with flags and pinwheels. We asked the Goddess to watch over the USA, guide the political leaders to be favorable for civil liberties, and offered thanks to the Native Americans who continue to grant the white people favorable passage on their lands (i.e, the USA).

July 2016 New Moon, ritual to Columbiana, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 New Moon, altar center, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 New Moon, offerings from the apricot tree, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

July 2016 New Moon, the apricot tree (with supports), Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

The society garden is growing strong! A month and a half of growing and many of the plants have bushed, vined, and stalked. Only a couple were lost, one cucumber, one corn, one pepper plant, and some onions. All in all, not so bad! The loss mainly may be due to the gophers or bad starters.

Peppers are coming in, vines on the watermelons and pumpkins have taken off, lettuce is growing high, squash is bushing, corn stalks are about 2 feet high and already show tassels, and onions are getting thick. The society is blessed with many plants and few pests!

Society Garden 2016, artichoke, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, peppers, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, peppers, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, anaheim pepper, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, Serrano chilies, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, celery, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, okra, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, watermelon, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, pumpkins, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, pumpkin patch, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, corn, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, yellow squash, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, leeks, cabbage (top) and lettuce (right), Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, baquieu lettuce, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, cabbage, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, view looking down garden with corn (back), squash (back middle), lettuce (middle), leeks (right), and cabbage (front) with Woman Between the Wolves, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, square garden area with tomatoes (back), cucumber (back middle), tomatillos (back middle right), shallots (front middle) and onions (right), Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, herbs Parsley (back), dill (cage), cilantro (front left) and oregano (right), Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Society Garden 2016, view of garden along fence, Saturday, July 2, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

SLPS celebrated Midsummer Saturday, June 18, 2016. The members gathered on freshly cut grass, and under the grove of the pines at the temple. The sun was low in the sky, allowing for a cool evening. President Muad’Dib led the ritual in the New American tradition. The Oak and Holly Kings were present, as well as Hern and Perun. SLPS honors the transitioning of the year from the Oak King to the Holly King at Midsummer, as the sun’s zenith is reached and starts to descend to the longest night at Yule.

A dialogue about Midsummer, the path of the sun, and why it’s important to do solar rites took place. Some hand holding and dancing around the altar to the song “Litha” on the album Circle of the Seaons by Lisa Thiel allowed the members to raise energy. Some Midsummer poetry, Sign of the Daisy by Helen Hunt Jackson was read.

Perun, the patriarch of the Slavic pantheon, descended and spoke to everyone present. Perun rules over lightning, thunder, fire, oak, eagle and the ax or hammer. He gave a message of love, acceptance and inclusion, speaking about the forgotten myth, messages, and the simple ways of living like a Slav (bear meat, mushrooms, cabbage, the woods). He said how lonely he gets, with no one to talk with, no one patroning the pantheon like they once did. He encouraged everyone to love each person, work by the sun and moon, to embrace the messages of the ancient kindred, and to live simply as the Slavs did. He blessed them and accepted everyone into his family.  This message was a first, as SLPS welcomed him to the temple as a new God just arrived from the Czech Republic.

Midsummer 2016, Shy Fox (l) and Camille Harriss making tri tip steak kababs, Saturday, June 18, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Midsummer 2016, altar, Saturday, June 18, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Midsummer 2016, altar center, Saturday, June 18, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Midsummer 2016, Perun, Saturday, June 18, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Midsummer 2016, l to r- Shy Fox, Stesha Bowden, Camille Harris, Woman Between the Wolves, Saturday, June 18, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Midsummer 2016, Sunset, Saturday, June 18, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT

Midsummer 2016, feast l to r- steak kababs, deviled eggs, rice salad, baked purple cauliflower with Stesha Bowden (l) and Shy Fox, Saturday, June 18, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT